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How to protect your ears from our noisy environment In a world full of noise—honking vehicles, amplified music, power mowers, and jackhammers—it’s important to take steps to safeguard your hearing. And some of the sounds you’ll want to protect yourself from might surprise you
BTE (Behind-The-Ear) The world’s most common hearing aid style. Available in standard, mini or power.
Hearing Aid Compatible Some hearing aids have a feature called a "telecoil" built into them. The telecoil allows the hearing aid to hear magnetic signal representing an audio signal instead (or in addition to) just an audio signal. A device that is "Hearing Aid Compatible" is designed to output the required magnetic signal that the telecoil can hear in additon to an audio signal. The term "Hearing Aid Compatible" is usually used to refer to telephones, but may also apply to headphones. Also, hearing aid users who have a telecoil in their hearing aid may use an ALD with a neckloop or with a silhouette to allow them to hear devices that are not by nature "Hearing Aid Compatible". Headphones: Not all headphones are "Hearing Aid Compatible", but those that use powerful magnets to drive the speakers may be. The most common headphone that people may encounter that is "Hearing Aid Compatible" is the "PhonicEar" Headphone (really an ALD which many movie theaters have to loan free to patrons who would like to hear the movie better. Many users can simply use that ALD acoustically, but users with a telecoil in their hearing aids may benefit from switching it on, since that particular headset is "Hearing Aid Compatible". Telephones: Most non-portable telephones, some remote phones, and a few cell phones sold in the United States are now "Hearing Aid Compatible". This means that the telephone speaker in the earpiece not only outputs the sound of the person you are talking to, but it also outputs a magnetic signal representing the sound. All early telephones were automatically hearing aid compatible, because they used magnets to drive the speaker in the earpiece. Telephones built a few years ago were probably not hearing aid compatible, because they frequently didn't use magnets to drive their speakers. Using a equipped hearing aid with a Hearing Aid Compatible telephone can dramatically improve your ability to hear on the telephone. Shop carefully, however, since the strength and effectiveness of Hearing Aid Compatible phones and of telecoil varies greatly. If you have more than a minor hearing loss, you may want to check out the several Hearing Aid Compatible telephones and especially those Amplified Telephones designed especially for hard of hearing people.
How hearing aids work Hearing aids use the same basic parts to carry sounds from the environment into your ear and make them louder. Most hearing aids are digital, and all are powered with a hearing aid battery. Small microphones collect sounds from the environment. A computer chip with an amplifier converts the incoming sound into digital code. It analyzes and adjusts the sound based on your hearing loss, listening needs and the level of the sounds around you. The amplified signals are then converted back into sound waves and delivered to your ears through speakers.
A Quick Guide To Hearing Aid Styles Hearing aids are available in a variety of styles designed to meet many different cosmetic preferences and address different hearing loss needs. Your hearing care professional can help you identify which hearing aid styles are appropriate for your specific needs and that is where marchearing.com We know that there’s not a ‘one size fits all’ approach to hearing aids. With custom colored and fit designs, we will take into account your lifestyle, your budget, your preferred style and your hearing needs when finding the perfect hearing aids for you. The first step towards your better hearing health is booking a hearing assessment so we can evaluate your hearing. Once this has been done, we can discuss your options, test a range of different styles and help you to make the right decision. So, what sort of styles are there to choose from? Firstly, let’s have a look at ‘in the ear’ (ITE) styles. Invisible in the canal This is one of our smallest custom styles which sits almost invisibly in the bend of the ear canal and is designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. Completely in the canal Another of our small custom styles, this device fits deeply and entirely within the ear canal and is designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. In the canal Another of our small devices, this hearing aid sits in the lower portion of the ear. As well as having a long battery life, it can also host additional features. These hearing aids are designed for mild to moderate hearing losses. Full shell Sitting flush within the outer ear bowl, the hearing aids size allows the maximum number of additional features. Using a larger battery and being able to fit a larger receiver makes them powerful enough for some severe hearing losses. A second option is ‘behind the ear’ (BTE) styles. Receiver in the ear These mini models have the speaker built into the ear tip and are designed for mild to severe hearing losses. BTE with Earmold These longer shaped models are suitable for hearing losses from mild through to severe. They come in a selection of colors and models. With all these great options available, you can be assured we can fit you with a device that lets you hear with confidence. All you need to do is book in with one of our Audiologists for a hearing examination and take your very first step toward a better hearing future.
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