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A Quick Guide To Hearing Aid Styles Hearing aids are available in a variety of styles designed to meet many different cosmetic preferences and address different hearing loss needs. Your hearing care professional can help you identify which hearing aid styles are appropriate for your specific needs and that is where marchearing.com We know that there’s not a ‘one size fits all’ approach to hearing aids. With custom colored and fit designs, we will take into account your lifestyle, your budget, your preferred style and your hearing needs when finding the perfect hearing aids for you. The first step towards your better hearing health is booking a hearing assessment so we can evaluate your hearing. Once this has been done, we can discuss your options, test a range of different styles and help you to make the right decision. So, what sort of styles are there to choose from? Firstly, let’s have a look at ‘in the ear’ (ITE) styles. Invisible in the canal This is one of our smallest custom styles which sits almost invisibly in the bend of the ear canal and is designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. Completely in the canal Another of our small custom styles, this device fits deeply and entirely within the ear canal and is designed for mild to moderate hearing loss. In the canal Another of our small devices, this hearing aid sits in the lower portion of the ear. As well as having a long battery life, it can also host additional features. These hearing aids are designed for mild to moderate hearing losses. Full shell Sitting flush within the outer ear bowl, the hearing aids size allows the maximum number of additional features. Using a larger battery and being able to fit a larger receiver makes them powerful enough for some severe hearing losses. A second option is ‘behind the ear’ (BTE) styles. Receiver in the ear These mini models have the speaker built into the ear tip and are designed for mild to severe hearing losses. BTE with Earmold These longer shaped models are suitable for hearing losses from mild through to severe. They come in a selection of colors and models. With all these great options available, you can be assured we can fit you with a device that lets you hear with confidence. All you need to do is book in with one of our Audiologists for a hearing examination and take your very first step toward a better hearing future.
What types of hearing aids are there, and which is the best fit? hearing-loss-Types-Hearing-Aids Hearing technology ranges from basic amplifiers to advanced digital hearing aids. Hearing aids come in various styles including: behind-the-ear (BTE), receiver-in-canal (RIC), and completely-in-canal (CIC). To determine the best device for you, keep in mind several factors: degree of hearing loss, ear canal size, and your own dexterity.
Hearing aid styles Hearing aids vary a great deal in price, size, special features and the way they're placed in your ear. The following are common hearing aid styles, beginning with the smallest, least visible in the ear. Hearing aid designers keep making smaller hearing aids to meet the demand for a hearing aid that is not very noticeable.
The behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid is the type of hearing aid most commonly recommended for infants and young children for a number of reasons, including: It accommodates various earmold types. The earmold detaches and can be easily remade as the child grows. The earmold is easy to handle and can be easily cleaned.
Behind the ear A behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid hooks over the top of your ear and rests behind the ear. A tube connects the hearing aid to a custom earpiece called an earmold that fits in your ear canal. This type is appropriate for people of all ages and those with almost any type of hearing loss. Behind-the-ear hearing aid: Traditionally has been the largest type of hearing aid, though some newer mini designs are streamlined and barely visible Is capable of more amplification than are other styles May pick up more wind noise than other style
Additional features Some hearing aid optional features improve your ability to hear in specific situations: Noise reduction. All hearing aids have some amount of noise reduction available. The amount of noise reduction varies. Directional microphones. These are aligned on the hearing aid to provide for improved pick up of sounds coming from in front of you with some reduction of sounds coming from behind or beside you. Some hearing aids are capable of focusing in one direction. Directional microphones can improve your ability to hear when you're in an environment with a lot of background noise. Rechargeable batteries. Some hearing aids have rechargeable batteries. This can make maintenance easier for you by eliminating the need to regularly change the battery. Telecoils. Telecoils make it easier to hear when talking on a telecoil-compatible telephone. The telecoil eliminates the sounds from your environment and only picks up the sounds from the telephone. Telecoils also pick up signals from public induction loop systems that can be found in some churches or theaters, allowing you to hear the speaker, play or movie better. Wireless connectivity. Increasingly, hearing aids can wirelessly interface with certain Bluetooth-compatible devices, such as cellphones, music players and televisions. You may need to use an intermediary device to pick up the phone or other signal and send it to the hearing aid. Remote controls. Some hearing aids come with a remote control, so you can adjust features without touching the hearing aid. Direct audio input. This feature allows you to plug in to audio from a television, a computer or a music device with a cord. Variable programming. Some hearing aids can store several preprogrammed settings for various listening needs and environments. Environmental noise control. Some hearing aids offer noise cancellation, which helps block out background noise. Some also offer wind noise reduction. Synchronization. For an individual with two hearing aids, the aids can be programmed to function together so that adjustments made to a hearing aid on one ear (volume control or program changes) will also be made on the other aid, allowing for simpler control.
Learning More About Hearing Loss To understand hearing health and hearing loss, you should first understand how your ear works to capture sound and transmit it to your brain. The outer ear is designed to capture sounds and funnel them into the ear canal. The sounds enter your ear canal, where they cause vibrations in your eardrum. The eardrum has the job of transferring the sound waves from your outer ear to your inner ear. As the sound passes through the inner ear, it vibrates tiny hair cells that represent individual frequencies or pitches. If you think about the inner ear as a piano, some hairs represent the highest notes on the piano, and some represent the lowest. As the various hairs vibrate, it triggers transmission of those frequencies to your brain for interpretation of what sound you have heard. Your ability to hear clearly can be impacted by certain medical conditions, genetics, accidents, prolonged exposure to loud noises, or even aging.
Hearing Aids: The Basic  Information  You Need to Know Hearing loss Basics about hearing aids  What are hearing aids and who are they for?  How does a hearing aid work?  Styles and common features Getting the most out of your hearing aids
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